Archive for the ‘Essays on Spiritual Humanism’ Category

INTELLECTUALISM AND REALITY- CONSIDERATION

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

(From my book: Spirituality Without God)

The path of self-transcendence is fundamentally characterized by the recognition and transcendence of all aspects of limitation on our being. Where there is a sense of ‘self’ to be transcended, there is limitation. And where there is limitation there is resistance. The separate self-sense is an ongoing process of resistance to the ever-fresh revelation of the living moment and consequently to life itself.

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The Quest for Human-centric Spirituality.

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

(From my book: Spirituality Without God)

The concept of God as the Great Other has existed in the human psyche for thousands of years.  It manifested in many different forms and dominated and controlled our lives ever since it appeared in the human mind as a projection of our highest moral and ethical ideals. No other aspect of human creation has had such profound effects on the quality of our everyday experience: from the most sublime to the lowest ebb of the inhumane in us.

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COMMENTARY ON NISARGADATTA

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

I was reading from Nisargadatta’s book, ‘I am That’, this morning, and stumbled upon these interesting and profound few lines:

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From ‘self’ to ‘Self’?

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

In the Hindu traditions we find two fundamentally different notions of ‘self’. There we have the little, or lower self, ‘jiva’, and the Higher Self , ‘Atman’. In other spiritual traditions we also notice how these two concepts have established themselves in the minds of mystics and non-mystics alike. And because of the pivotal role these two terms often play within these traditions, it may be worthwhile looking at these also from a purely humanist perspective.

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SPIRITUAL HUMANISM – Transcending the rational/scientific model for human well-being.

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

It would seem not unreasonable to suggest that for the Humanist movements to arrive at the most realistic comprehension of reality, which of necessity has to include the human condition as such, the full spectrum of human potential will have to be engaged for such an enquiry to be comprehensive and truly representative of human life. No movement towards a  penetrating and integral understanding of life can take place in the context of a limited, and self-limiting, definition of the human condition.  To consider reality in the fullest way possible, the human spirit of enquiry has to be set free unconditionally for it to engage itself at all levels of investigation, both outwardly and inwardly:  outwardly in how we see and experience our world; inwardly in how we view and experience ourselves.

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THE SOWER, THE SEED AND THE SOIL

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

This is an essay I presented to the Universalist Quaker magazine. It was rejected on the grounds that it was too vague, unsubstantiated and that it does not represent the editor’s conviction that human nature is not to be trusted as a source of wisdom and well-being.

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ENLIGHTENMENT IS NOT FOR SISSIES

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

You can relax about your feverish quest for enlightenment. Enlightenment is not for sissies. It is not even for the brave, the dedicated, the valiant or the keen spiritual seeker.  In fact, enlightenment is for no-one.  The good news is that you are already enlightened –  potentially, that is.  The bad news is that you will never get there.  When the simplicity of enlightenment finally dawns, you will not be around to appreciate it, or to give yourself a pat on the shoulder for your nifty achievement. Also, there will be no-one else to congratulate you.  If they do, because they see a strange kind of smile on your face, or detect that you have finally gone a bit crazy, they will be talking to someone that no longer exists.  Do what you may, enlightenment is not for you.

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ENLIGHTENMENT, PERFECTION AND HUMANIZATION

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

In ‘Spirituality Without God’ I describe a process of the complete humanization of our being freed from dependence on the God-paradigm which generally supports the notion of perfected life of enlightenment. One of the pivotal insights of  ‘Spiritual Humanism’ is that once the inquiry into integral humane living has abandoned the notion of God as the ultimate destiny of our spiritual search, the idea of the perfection of human life also falls away.

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SPIRITUAL HUMANISM and the Question of Doing vs non-doing

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

In the following reply to a questioner, Möller addresses the fundamental difference between his consideration and what he refers to as the ‘intellectual Neo- Advaitist teachers’.

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A HUMANIST VIEW OF TRANSCENDENT LIVING

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

There appears to be considerable confusion in humanist thinking with regard to the notion of transcendent living, and what is often referred to as ‘altered states of consciousness’.  However, from the perspective of Spiritual Humanism, these are not inimical to integral human development.  It may therefore be worth for us to enquire briefly into these, and perhaps in the process arrive at greater clarity with regard to their appropriateness in a truly humanistic enquiry.

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PRINCIPLES OF SPIRITUAL HUMANISM

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

SPIRITUAL HUMANISM DECLARES THAT:

1) At its deepest and most simplified  level, human experience exhibits a wholeness of being which expresses itself as unconditioned intelligence, emotional well-being, love and empathy.

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